alyssa.marie.simmons@gmail.com

Sep 11

Applied Statistics Workshop (Gov 3009)

11:00am to 12:30pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138



This methodological workshop offers a tour of Harvard's statistical innovations and applications with weekly stops in different disciplines. It presents opportunities for faculty, visitors, and graduate students to present ongoing research. For additional details, please click here



Graduate Student Coordinator: Tess Wise



This lecture meets on the third floor of CGIS Knafel. Lunch will be served. 



Presentation Details



Presenter: Peter Aronow, Yale University



Title: Does Regression Produce Representative Estimates of Causal Effects?



Abstract: It is well-known that, with an unrepresentative sample, the estimate of a causal effect may fail to characterize how effects operate in the population of interest. What is less well understood is that conventional estimation practices for observational studies may produce the same problem even with a representative sample. Specifically, causal effects estimated via multiple regression differentially weight each unit's contribution. The ``effective sample'' that regression uses to generate the causal effect estimate may bear little resemblance to the population of interest. The effects that multiple regression estimate may be nonrepresentative in a similar manner as are effects produced via quasi-experimental methods such as instrumental variables, matching, or regression discontinuity designs, implying there is no representativeness basis for preferring multiple regression on representative samples over quasi-experimental methods. We show how to estimate the implied ``multiple regression weights'' for each unit, thus allowing researchers to visualize the characteristics of the effective sample. Knowing the effective sample is crucial, because it allows one to relate effect estimates to sample characteristics. We then discuss alternative approaches that, under certain conditions, recover representative average causal effects. The requisite conditions cannot always be met.



Oct 04

Making Sense out of Spatial Data

12:00pm to 2:00pm

Location: 

Room 209, Kresge Building. 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115



An introduction to spatial analysis for various kinds of problem solving in a GIS environment. Examples of both raster and vector data-based spatial operations like overlay, buffering, and interpolation will be covered.



Instructor: Sumeeta Srinivasan



For more information and to sign up, please click here

Dec 02

Research Workshop in Political Economy (GOV 3007)

12:00pm to 2:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

The Research Workshop on Political Economy (Government 3007) is a full-year course open to all graduate students and faculty. For the 2013-14 academic year, the workshop will be run by Muhammet Bas, Robert Bates, and Horacio Larreguy.

The Workshop is organized to facilitate graduate student-faculty discussion of research in progress. Faculty and graduate-student members of the Workshop meet weekly to present and discuss work by Workshop members. This work could be versions of dissertation prospectuses, thesis chapters, stand-alone research papers, or simply rough ideas for new research. Practice job talks are also welcome, and those planning to go on the market this fall should be in touch ASAP to schedule their presentation.

The Workshop gives graduate students the opportunity to interact with an interdisciplinary group of faculty interested in Political Economy. It provides a venue for in-depth discussion of student work with faculty and graduate-student peers. All graduate students interested in Political Economy, regardless of field of concentration or year, are invited to take the Workshop.

    • Time - Mondays, 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM
    • Location - Rm K354, 1737 Cambridge St (CGIS Knafel Building)
    • Eligibility - Open to all members of the Harvard community
    • Coordinator - Akos Lada


Visit the Faculty of Arts and Sciences course site for detailed schedule information.

Presentation Details

Presenters: Jon Fiva, Paper; Giovanni Reggiani and Filippo Mezzanotti, Paper

Dec 09

Getting Started with the RCE

3:00pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

Room K018, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

Intended for new users who would like to start using the Research Computing Environment (RCE), this short one-hour course provides a kickstart introduction to using the RCE. The RCE enables social scientists to use popular statistical programs for computations on a shared pool of computing resources. The RCE is accessed remotely and securely via a tool called NX. That is, you can use the RCE from your laptop or desktop anywhere on campus or even anywhere in the world. This short course is intended to get new users started by showing how to install the NX software on a laptop or desktop machine and connecting to the RCE via NX. The RCE will appear as a familiar desktop environment with menus to choose statistical and office productivity applications. This short course will be provided monthly in a classroom format and as an online version that will always be available. Users are welcome to bring their laptops to install RCE right in the class and be ready to use the RCE upon leaving the class.

Oct 21

Research Workshop in Political Economy (GOV 3007)

11:00am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138









The Research Workshop on Political Economy (Government 3007) is a full-year course open to all graduate students and faculty. For the 2013-14 academic year, the workshop will be run by Muhammet Bas, Robert Bates, and Horacio Larreguy.



The Workshop is organized to facilitate graduate student-faculty discussion of research in progress. Faculty and graduate-student members of the Workshop meet weekly to present and discuss work by Workshop members. This work could be versions of dissertation prospectuses, thesis chapters, stand-alone research papers, or simply rough ideas for new research. Practice job talks are also welcome, and those planning to go on the market this fall should be in touch ASAP to schedule their presentation.



The Workshop gives graduate students the opportunity to interact with an interdisciplinary group of faculty interested in Political Economy. It provides a venue for in-depth discussion of student work with faculty and graduate-student peers. All graduate students interested in Political Economy, regardless of field of concentration or year, are invited to take the Workshop.





    • Time - Mondays, 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM


    • Location - Rm K354, 1737 Cambridge St (CGIS Knafel Building)


    • Eligibility - Open to all members of the Harvard community


    • Coordinator - Akos Lada



Visit the Faculty of Arts and Sciences course site for detailed schedule information.



Presentation Details



Presenter: Evan Schnidman, Job Market

Dec 09

Topics in Privacy/ Technology in Government

2:30pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

TIP-TIG is a weekly session for brainstorming and discussing any aspect of privacy (TIP) or on technology in government (TIG), hosted by the Data Privacy Lab. Discussions are often inspired by a real-world problems being faced by the lead discussant, who may be from industry, government, or academia. Practice talks and presentations on specific techniques and topics are also common. This meeting occurs on the 3rd floor of CGIS Knafel; refreshments served at 2:30pm, discussion 3:00pm to 4:00pm. 

More information is available at http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/index.html.

Presentation Details

Title: Biometrics in Beta - India's Identity Experiment

Discussant: Malavika Jayaram, Berkman Fellow

Abstract: India's identity juggernaut - the Unique Identity (UID) project that has registered around 450 million people and is yet to be fully realized - is already the world's largest biometrics identity scheme. Based on the premise that centralized de-duplication and authentication will establish uniqueness and eliminate fraud, it is hailed as a game changer and a silver bullet that will solve myriad problems and improve welfare delivery, yet its conception and architecture raise significant concerns. In addition to the UID project, there is a slew of "Big Brother" systems that together form a matrix of identity and surveillance schemes: the UID is intended as a common identifier across this matrix as well as other public and private databases. Indian authorities frame Big Data as a panacea for fraud, corruption and abuse, without apprehending the further fraud, corruption and abuse that joined up databases can themselves engender. The creation of a privacy-invading technology layer not simply as a barrier to online participation but to social participation writ large is not fully appreciated by policy makers. Malavika will provide an overview of the identity landscape including the implications for privacy and free speech, and more broadly, democracy and openness.

Nov 20

Applied Statistics Workshop (Gov 3009)

12:00pm to 1:30pm



This methodological workshop offers a tour of Harvard's statistical innovations and applications with weekly stops in different disciplines. It presents opportunities for faculty, visitors, and graduate students to present ongoing research. For additional details, please click here



Graduate Student Coordinator: Tess Wise



This lecture meets on the third floor of CGIS Knafel. Lunch will be served. 



Presentation Details









Presenter: Stefan Hoderlein, Harvard University, Department of Economics



Professor Hoderlein's work is mainly concerned with finding general ways to model heterogeneity in the application of microeconomic models, specifically, nonseparable models and random coefficient models. Because of its general nature, Professor Hoderlein's research has a significant nonparametric component. Applications came from a number of fields, but Professor Hoderlein has a particular interest in consumer demand models.

Oct 11

GPS Workshop

12:30pm to 3:30pm

Location: 

Room B127, The Northwest Building. 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge MA 02138



This workshop will introduce the concept and various uses of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Students will use mapping GPS devices in the field, and upload the mapped data into desktop and internet mapping applications. Intended for students / researchers who plan to use GPS for their field work. Note: This workshop includes time outside, so dress accordingly. Bring your own GPS unit, if you have one.



Instructor: Jeff Blossom



Nov 01

Exploring Google's Mapping Products

12:00pm to 2:00pm

Location: 

Room B127, The Northwest Building. 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge MA 02138



Google provides several free to use online and desktop mapping services. In this workshop the Google products MyMaps, Mash-ups, Earth, and Fusion Tables will be introduced. Students will practice using these tools to perform geocoding, and will make a variety of custom maps and visualizations. Students will also learn the differences between these Google mapping products, and which product to use for certain tasks.



Instructor: Jeff Blossom

Feb 03

Getting Started with the RCE

3:00pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

Room K018, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

Intended for new users who would like to start using the Research Computing Environment (RCE), this short one-hour course provides a kickstart introduction to using the RCE. The RCE enables social scientists to use popular statistical programs for computations on a shared pool of computing resources. The RCE is accessed remotely and securely via a tool called NX. That is, you can use the RCE from your laptop or desktop anywhere on campus or even anywhere in the world. This short course is intended to get new users started by showing how to install the NX software on a laptop or desktop machine and connecting to the RCE via NX. The RCE will appear as a familiar desktop environment with menus to choose statistical and office productivity applications. This short course will be provided monthly in a classroom format and as an online version that will always be available. Users are welcome to bring their laptops to install RCE right in the class and be ready to use the RCE upon leaving the class.

Sep 30

Topics in Privacy/ Technology in Government

1:30pm to 3:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138



TIP-TIG is a weekly session for brainstorming and discussing any aspect of privacy (TIP) or on technology in government (TIG), hosted by the Data Privacy Lab. Discussions are often inspired by a real-world problems being faced by the lead discussant, who may be from industry, government, or academia. Practice talks and presentations on specific techniques and topics are also common. This meeting occurs on the 3rd floor of CGIS Knafel; refreshments served at 2:30pm, discussion 3:00pm to 4:00pm. 



More information is available at <ahighlight="" href="http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/schedule.html" data-mce-href="http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/schedule.html">http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/schedule.html.



Presentation Details



Discussant: Alex Frost, Chief Strategist and Founder at Scholarly Labs



Title: How to Get the Best Discussions from an Online Community



Abstract: Can organizations improve upon traditional meetings, committees, and conferences to facilitate knowledge transfer, drive decisions, and develop policy? We examine some successes and failures in online communities and social media to look for answers, and present an optimistic vision for the focused use of online discussion environments to improve capacity. Our framework starts with the understanding that most organizations will benefit from aggregating insights from their leading edges -- but that traditional meetings involving synchronous interactions aren't a good fit to effect knowledge sharing in large groups. Examining a range of approaches to aggregate and synthesize knowledge such as traditional meetings and market research, and online communities of practice, wikis, question-and-answer systems, and other discussion fora reveals common tradeoffs among stability, activity, and bias. We consider these trade-offs, suggest strategies and tactics to overcome common points of failure, and briefly explore some implications of effectively engaging large groups in decision making and policy development. 

Oct 28

Research Workshop in Political Economy (GOV 3007)

11:00am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138



The Research Workshop on Political Economy (Government 3007) is a full-year course open to all graduate students and faculty. For the 2013-14 academic year, the workshop will be run by Muhammet Bas, Robert Bates, and Horacio Larreguy.



The Workshop is organized to facilitate graduate student-faculty discussion of research in progress. Faculty and graduate-student members of the Workshop meet weekly to present and discuss work by Workshop members. This work could be versions of dissertation prospectuses, thesis chapters, stand-alone research papers, or simply rough ideas for new research. Practice job talks are also welcome, and those planning to go on the market this fall should be in touch ASAP to schedule their presentation.



The Workshop gives graduate students the opportunity to interact with an interdisciplinary group of faculty interested in Political Economy. It provides a venue for in-depth discussion of student work with faculty and graduate-student peers. All graduate students interested in Political Economy, regardless of field of concentration or year, are invited to take the Workshop.





    • Time - Mondays, 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM



    • Location - Rm K354, 1737 Cambridge St (CGIS Knafel Building)



    • Eligibility - Open to all members of the Harvard community



    • Coordinator - Akos Lada




Visit the Faculty of Arts and Sciences course site for detailed schedule information.



Presentation Details



Presenter: Julia Cage, Job Market

Sep 16

Research Workshop in Political Economy (GOV 3007)

11:00am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138



The Research Workshop on Political Economy (Government 3007) is a full-year course open to all graduate students and faculty. For the 2013-14 academic year, the workshop will be run by Muhammet Bas, Robert Bates, and Horacio Larreguy.



The Workshop is organized to facilitate graduate student-faculty discussion of research in progress. Faculty and graduate-student members of the Workshop meet weekly to present and discuss work by Workshop members. This work could be versions of dissertation prospectuses, thesis chapters, stand-alone research papers, or simply rough ideas for new research. Practice job talks are also welcome, and those planning to go on the market this fall should be in touch ASAP to schedule their presentation.



The Workshop gives graduate students the opportunity to interact with an interdisciplinary group of faculty interested in Political Economy. It provides a venue for in-depth discussion of student work with faculty and graduate-student peers. All graduate students interested in Political Economy, regardless of field of concentration or year, are invited to take the Workshop.





    • Time - Mondays, 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM



    • Location - Rm K354, 1737 Cambridge St (CGIS Knafel Building)



    • Eligibility - Open to all members of the Harvard community



    • Coordinator - Akos Lada




Visit the Faculty of Arts and Sciences course site for detailed schedule information.



Presentation Details



Presenter: Vincent Pons, Job Market

Oct 21

Topics in Privacy/ Technology in Government

1:30pm to 3:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138



TIP-TIG is a weekly session for brainstorming and discussing any aspect of privacy (TIP) or on technology in government (TIG), hosted by the Data Privacy Lab. Discussions are often inspired by a real-world problems being faced by the lead discussant, who may be from industry, government, or academia. Practice talks and presentations on specific techniques and topics are also common. This meeting occurs on the 3rd floor of CGIS Knafel; refreshments served at 2:30pm, discussion 3:00pm to 4:00pm. 



More information is available at <ahighlight="" href="http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/schedule.html" data-mce-href="http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/schedule.html">http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/schedule.html.



Presentation Details



Discussant: Holly Jacobs, Cybercivilrights.org



Title: Revenge Porn and the Business of Internet Humiliation



Abstract: The smart phone has transformed millions of people into pornographers ready to record their intimate moments. The heat of passion can turn terribly wrong after a breakup if a spurned lovers decides to share the images with the world. The talk will outline sites that seek to humiliate by posting mug shots, horrible reviews and explicit images and discuss what can be done about the business of humiliation.



Adam Tanner, Fellow, Department of Government, Harvard University, author of forthcoming book on the business of personal data, and Forbes columnist.



Dr. Holly Jacobs, Founder of End Revenge Porn and victim seeking to criminalize revenge porn.

Oct 30

Applied Statistics Workshop (Gov 3009)

11:00am to 12:30pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138



This methodological workshop offers a tour of Harvard's statistical innovations and applications with weekly stops in different disciplines. It presents opportunities for faculty, visitors, and graduate students to present ongoing research. For additional details, please click here



Graduate Student Coordinator: Tess Wise



This lecture meets on the third floor of CGIS Knafel. Lunch will be served.



Presentation Details



Presenter: Cathy O'Neil, mathbabe.org



Abstract: Abstract: In this talk I will discuss the common problems data nerds face when they work in industry. Those include problems that academic statisticians face, of course, but also extend to other kinds of communication and political problems. Moreover, considering the cultural effects of widespread mathematical modeling, the general inaccessibility of mathematical models from the point of the view of the public, and the general blind trust the average person has in mathematics, it's potentially a pretty big deal. Let's try to categorize the risks and start coming up with ways to address them through setting standards for modeling as well as through educating the public.

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