alyssa.marie.simmons@gmail.com

Oct 07

Research Workshop in Political Economy (Gov 3007)

11:00am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138









The Research Workshop on Political Economy (Government 3007) is a full-year course open to all graduate students and faculty. For the 2013-14 academic year, the workshop will be run by Muhammet Bas, Robert Bates, and Horacio Larreguy.



The Workshop is organized to facilitate graduate student-faculty discussion of research in progress. Faculty and graduate-student members of the Workshop meet weekly to present and discuss work by Workshop members. This work could be versions of dissertation prospectuses, thesis chapters, stand-alone research papers, or simply rough ideas for new research. Practice job talks are also welcome, and those planning to go on the market this fall should be in touch ASAP to schedule their presentation.



The Workshop gives graduate students the opportunity to interact with an interdisciplinary group of faculty interested in Political Economy. It provides a venue for in-depth discussion of student work with faculty and graduate-student peers. All graduate students interested in Political Economy, regardless of field of concentration or year, are invited to take the Workshop.





    • Time - Mondays, 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM


    • Location - Rm K354, 1737 Cambridge St (CGIS Knafel Building)


    • Eligibility - Open to all members of the Harvard community


    • Coordinator - Akos Lada



Visit the Faculty of Arts and Sciences course site for detailed schedule information.



Presentation Details



Presenter: ByungKwon Song, Job Market

Dec 02

Topics in Privacy/ Technology in Government

2:30pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

TIP-TIG is a weekly session for brainstorming and discussing any aspect of privacy (TIP) or on technology in government (TIG), hosted by the Data Privacy Lab. Discussions are often inspired by a real-world problems being faced by the lead discussant, who may be from industry, government, or academia. Practice talks and presentations on specific techniques and topics are also common. This meeting occurs on the 3rd floor of CGIS Knafel; refreshments served at 2:30pm, discussion 3:00pm to 4:00pm. 

More information is available at http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/index.html.

Presentation Details

Discussants: Deb Hurley

Oct 23

Applied Statistics Workshop (Gov 3009)

11:00am to 12:30pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

This methodological workshop offers a tour of Harvard's statistical innovations and applications with weekly stops in different disciplines. It presents opportunities for faculty, visitors, and graduate students to present ongoing research. For additional details, please click here. 



Graduate Student Coordinator: <ahighlight="" href="mailto:wise@fas.harvard.edu" data-mce-href="mailto:wise@fas.harvard.edu">Tess Wise



This lecture meets on the third floor of CGIS Knafel. Lunch will be served. 



Presentation Details



Presenter: Teppei Yamamoto, MIT









Teppei Yamamoto is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Professor Yamamoto obtained a B.A. in Liberal Arts from the University of Tokyo (2006) and a M.A. (2008) and Ph.D. (2011) in Politics from Princeton University, where he received a Charlotte Elizabeth Procter fellowship for the year of 2010 to 2011. Professor Yamamoto's doctoral dissertation won the John T. Williams Dissertation Prize in 2010 from the Society for Political Methodology. Professor Yamamoto also studied at Lincoln College, the University of Oxford, as a visiting student.



Professor Yamamoto is broadly interested in the development of quantitative methods for political science data. His research has focused on statistical methods for causal inference, including causal attribution, causal mediation, causal moderation, and causal inference with measurement error. Professor Yamamoto also studies applied Bayesian statistics, with a focus on discrete choice models and empirical applications in electoral studies and comparative political behavior.



Professor Yamamoto's work has appeared or will appear shortly in academic journals such as American Journal of Political ScienceAmerican Political Science ReviewJournal of the Royal Statistical Society Series APolitical Analysis, and Statistical Science.

Oct 04

Geoprocessing with ModelBuilder

12:00pm to 2:00pm

Location: 

Room B127, The Northwest Building. 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge MA 02138



Geoprocessing tasks can be time intensive since they often performed on a number of different and large datasets. This hand-on workshop will gently introduce Model Builder in ArcGIS Desktop, and show how you can use them to increase productivity and the quality of your data.



Instructor: Giovanni Zambotti



For more information and to sign up, please click here

Oct 25

Open Source Desktop GIS with Quantum

12:00pm to 2:00pm

Location: 

Room B127, The Northwest Building. 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge MA 02138



An introduction to Quantum GIS for beginners, this workshop will cover the basic methods for opening various data formats, dealing with projections, joining tabular data to vector GIS layers, symbolization, and exporting data. No previous knowledge of GIS or statistics is required.



Instructor: Lex Berman

Jan 06

Getting Started with the RCE

3:00pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

Room K018, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

Intended for new users who would like to start using the Research Computing Environment (RCE), this short one-hour course provides a kickstart introduction to using the RCE. The RCE enables social scientists to use popular statistical programs for computations on a shared pool of computing resources. The RCE is accessed remotely and securely via a tool called NX. That is, you can use the RCE from your laptop or desktop anywhere on campus or even anywhere in the world. This short course is intended to get new users started by showing how to install the NX software on a laptop or desktop machine and connecting to the RCE via NX. The RCE will appear as a familiar desktop environment with menus to choose statistical and office productivity applications. This short course will be provided monthly in a classroom format and as an online version that will always be available. Users are welcome to bring their laptops to install RCE right in the class and be ready to use the RCE upon leaving the class.

Sep 23

Topics in Privacy/ Technology in Government

1:30pm to 3:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138



TIP-TIG is a weekly session for brainstorming and discussing any aspect of privacy (TIP) or on technology in government (TIG), hosted by the Data Privacy Lab. Discussions are often inspired by a real-world problems being faced by the lead discussant, who may be from industry, government, or academia. Practice talks and presentations on specific techniques and topics are also common. This meeting occurs on the 3rd floor of CGIS Knafel; refreshments served at 2:30pm, discussion 3:00pm to 4:00pm. 



More information is available at http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/schedule.html.



Presentation Details



Discussant: Adrian Gropper, MD



Title: Fair Information Practice for Cyber ID and Relationship Locator Services 



Abstract: We design databases as honeypots of private information. The mother of all honeypots is the Relationship Locator Service (RLS) - without it, assembling the rest of the database is very very difficult. The RLS can be message metadata assembled by the NSA or it can be a state health information exchange. Fair information practice for cyber ID means engineering for transparency, oversight and accountability in our relationship locator services as our relationships increasingly shift online. It requires a smooth transition from in-person relationships with our physician, to online relationship with our health records resulting from in-person relationships and finally to online relationship to RLS data brokers that have no in-person relationship to the individual. Fair information practice for Cyber ID needs to respect the sovereignty of the individual by minimizing privacy risk when possible and maximizing transparency and accountability when operating relationship locator services. This talk will use the example of Massachusetts Health Information Exchange Relationship Locator Service to frame a discussion of patient cyber ID.

Oct 18

Worldmap Training

12:00pm to 2:00pm

Location: 

Room B127, Northwest Building. 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge MA 02138



The Center for Geographic Analysis is developing WorldMap (http://worldmap.harvard.edu/), an open source platform designed to encourage collaboration between researchers who need access to geospatial information. Despite the many ways in which research materials can now be accessed and shared across the web, the methods suitable for geospatial materials lag. The reasons are many and interconnected: 1) the sparse implementation of standards for geospatial interoperability, 2) the size and complexity of geospatial datasets, 3) the lack of a platform to support geospatial collaboration that is easy to obtain and install, 4) the lack of an incentive for researchers to upload geospatial datasets to a system that supports eventual sharing. Participants will learn Worldmap's design, architecture and functionality, and how it attempts to fill the gaps mentioned above.



Instructor: Ben Lewis

Sep 09

Research Workshop in Political Economy (GOV 3007)

11:00am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138



The Research Workshop on Political Economy (Government 3007) is a full-year course open to all graduate students and faculty. For the 2013-14 academic year, the workshop will be run by Muhammet Bas, Robert Bates, and Horacio Larreguy.



The Workshop is organized to facilitate graduate student-faculty discussion of research in progress. Faculty and graduate-student members of the Workshop meet weekly to present and discuss work by Workshop members. This work could be versions of dissertation prospectuses, thesis chapters, stand-alone research papers, or simply rough ideas for new research. Practice job talks are also welcome, and those planning to go on the market this fall should be in touch ASAP to schedule their presentation.



The Workshop gives graduate students the opportunity to interact with an interdisciplinary group of faculty interested in Political Economy. It provides a venue for in-depth discussion of student work with faculty and graduate-student peers. All graduate students interested in Political Economy, regardless of field of concentration or year, are invited to take the Workshop.





    • Time - Mondays, 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM



    • Location - Rm K354, 1737 Cambridge St (CGIS Knafel Building)



    • Eligibility - Open to all members of the Harvard community



    • Coordinator - Akos Lada




Visit the Faculty of Arts and Sciences course site for detailed schedule information.



Presentation Details



Presenter: Maxwell Palmer, Job Market

Oct 07

Topics in Privacy/Technology in Government

1:30pm to 3:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138



TIP-TIG is a weekly session for brainstorming and discussing any aspect of privacy (TIP) or on technology in government (TIG), hosted by the Data Privacy Lab. Discussions are often inspired by a real-world problems being faced by the lead discussant, who may be from industry, government, or academia. Practice talks and presentations on specific techniques and topics are also common. This meeting occurs on the 3rd floor of CGIS Knafel; refreshments served at 2:30pm, discussion 3:00pm to 4:00pm. 



More information is available at <ahighlight="" href="http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/schedule.html" data-mce-href="http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/schedule.html">http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/schedule.html.



Presentation Details



Discussant: Bruce Schneier



Title: The NSA, Snowden, and Surveillance



Additional Information: Bruce Schneier is an internationally renowned security technologist, called a security guru by The Economist. He is the author of 12 books -- including Liars and Outliers: Enabling the Trust Society Needs to Survive -- as well as hundreds of articles, essays, and academic papers. His influential newsletter Crypto-Gram and his blog Schneier on Security are read by over 250,000 people. He has testified before Congress, is a frequent guest on television and radio, has served on several government committees, and is regularly quoted in the press. Schneier is a fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School, a program fellow at the New America Foundation's Open Technology Institute, a board member of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, an Advisory Board Member of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, and the Security Futurologist for BT -- formerly British Telecom. 

Nov 06

Robert Wood Johnson Scholars in Health Policy Research Core Seminar

1:00pm to 2:30pm

Location: 

Room 439, Kresge Building, Harvard School of Public Health. 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115

Speaker: Benjamin Sommers, Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Economics in the Department of Health Care Policy and Management, Harvard University

Title: New Evidence on the ACA's Medicaid Expansion: Lessons from Early Expansion States

Abstract: The Affordable Care Act will expand Medicaid in 2014 to millions of low-income adults in states that choose to participate.  Several states chose to expand Medicaid eligibility under the ACA even earlier in 2010-2011, to some of the same individuals targeted by the ACA's expansion.  Using administrative and survey data, plus in-depth interviews with Medicaid directors in six states, we examined the implementation strategies and challenges experienced by state officials, and present early results on the impact of these expansions on enrollment, coverage, and crowd-out.

*RSVPs to skochavi@rwj.harvard.edu preferred, but not necessary. 

Mar 03

Getting Started with the RCE

3:00pm to 4:00pm

Location: 

Room K018, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

Intended for new users who would like to start using the Research Computing Environment (RCE), this short one-hour course provides a kickstart introduction to using the RCE. The RCE enables social scientists to use popular statistical programs for computations on a shared pool of computing resources. The RCE is accessed remotely and securely via a tool called NX. That is, you can use the RCE from your laptop or desktop anywhere on campus or even anywhere in the world. This short course is intended to get new users started by showing how to install the NX software on a laptop or desktop machine and connecting to the RCE via NX. The RCE will appear as a familiar desktop environment with menus to choose statistical and office productivity applications. This short course will be provided monthly in a classroom format and as an online version that will always be available. Users are welcome to bring their laptops to install RCE right in the class and be ready to use the RCE upon leaving the class.

Sep 20

GIS Basics with ArcGIS

12:00pm to 2:00pm

Location: 

Room 209, Kresge Building. 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115



Brief introduction to GIS-related terminology and spatial data basics. Students will create a basic map using ArcGIS. 



Instructor: Sumeeta Srinivasan



For more information and to sign up, click here.  

Nov 04

Research Workshop in Political Economy (GOV 3007)

12:00pm to 2:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138

The Research Workshop on Political Economy (Government 3007) is a full-year course open to all graduate students and faculty. For the 2013-14 academic year, the workshop will be run by Muhammet Bas, Robert Bates, and Horacio Larreguy.

The Workshop is organized to facilitate graduate student-faculty discussion of research in progress. Faculty and graduate-student members of the Workshop meet weekly to present and discuss work by Workshop members. This work could be versions of dissertation prospectuses, thesis chapters, stand-alone research papers, or simply rough ideas for new research. Practice job talks are also welcome, and those planning to go on the market this fall should be in touch ASAP to schedule their presentation.

The Workshop gives graduate students the opportunity to interact with an interdisciplinary group of faculty interested in Political Economy. It provides a venue for in-depth discussion of student work with faculty and graduate-student peers. All graduate students interested in Political Economy, regardless of field of concentration or year, are invited to take the Workshop.

    • Time - Mondays, 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM
    • Location - Rm K354, 1737 Cambridge St (CGIS Knafel Building)
    • Eligibility - Open to all members of the Harvard community
    • Coordinator - Akos Lada

Visit the Faculty of Arts and Sciences course site for detailed schedule information.

Presentation Details

Presenter: Evan Schnidman, Job Market

Sep 16

Topics in Privacy/ Technology in Government

1:30pm to 3:00pm

Location: 

Room K354, CGIS Knafel. 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge MA 02138



TIP-TIG is a weekly session for brainstorming and discussing any aspect of privacy (TIP) or on technology in government (TIG), hosted by the Data Privacy Lab. Discussions are often inspired by a real-world problems being faced by the lead discussant, who may be from industry, government, or academia. Practice talks and presentations on specific techniques and topics are also common. This meeting occurs on the 3rd floor of CGIS Knafel; refreshments served at 2:30pm, discussion 3:00pm to 4:00pm. 



More information is available at <<ahighlight="" href="http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/schedule.html" data-mce-href="http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/schedule.html">http://dataprivacylab.org/TIP/schedule.html>.



Presentation Details



Speaker: Murat Kantarcioglu, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department and Director of the Data Security and Privacy Lab at the University of Texas at Dallas. He is also a visiting scholar at the Data Privacy Lab at Harvard University.



Dr. Kantarcioglu’s research focuses on creating technologies that can efficiently extract useful information from any data without sacrificing privacy or security.  He has published over 100 papers in peer reviewed journals and conferences. His research has been supported by grants from NSF, AFOSR, ONR, NSA, and NIH and has received two best paper awards.  He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER award and his research has been reported on in the media, including the Boston Globe and ABC News.  He holds a B.S. in Computer Engineering from Middle East Technical University, and M.S. and Ph.D degrees in Computer Science from Purdue University. He is a senior member of IEEE and ACM.



Title: Mining Distributed Data without Violating Privacy



Abstract: The quantity of data that is captured, collected, and stored by a wide variety of organizations is growing at an exponential rate.  The potential for such data to support scientific discovery and optimization of existing systems is significant, but only if it can be integrated and analyzed in a meaningful way by a wide range of investigators.  While many believe that data sharing is desirable, there are also privacy and security concerns, rooted in ethics and the law that often prevent many legitimate and noteworthy applications.  In this talk, I will provide an overview on our research regarding how to integrate and mine large amounts of privacy-sensitive  distributed data without violating such constraints.  In doing so, I will discuss how to incentivize data sharing in privacy-preserving distributed data mining applications.  This work will draw upon examples form the biomedical domain and discuss recent research on privacy-preserving mining of genomic databases.



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